Archives: First Amendment

American Library Association’s list of “most challenged books” for 2020

June 1, 2021 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, journalism.

Chances are, there’s a group in your community that wants to dictate what books you and your children can read. They often do this by telling public libraries what they should not put on the shelves. Most libraries resist this kind of pressure, and the American Library Association keeps track of these challenges. Here is • Read More »

Hugh Walpole, reactions to masks and COVID-19, First Amendment violations, and an international watercolor conspiracy: newsletter, July 3, 2020

July 5, 2020 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, journalism, newsletter, writers, writing.

This newsletter was sent to everyone on Jim’s email list (2,5xx) on Friday, July 3, 2020.   An international cabal of industrialists and watercolorists has met in secret (not sure when, probably at night; not sure where, probably Switzerland) and decided that July will be International Watercolor Month. I will continue my investigations and report my • Read More »

Yes, people are still trying to ban books. And they should be opposed.

September 19, 2018 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, journalism.

You can shield yourself from ideas that make you uncomfortable or that you disagree with. You may be able, to some extent, to limit the exposure that the young people in your care have to those ideas. But you cannot shield your community from the things you disagree with. That’s called censorship, and in any practical • Read More »

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The purpose of great literature: to make people comfortable

February 14, 2018 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: First Amendment, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, journalism.

That’s what school officials in Duluth, Minnesota (and a few other places, unfortunately) would have you believe. The school system in Duluth is the latest to remove To Kill a Mockingbird and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from the required reading list for ninth graders. The reason they give: the language used in these books • Read More »

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Artist Daniel Moore announces latest national championship painting

February 7, 2018 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: First Amendment, sports.

Moore discovered a gold mine for his artwork in 1979 when he produced “The Goal Line Stand,” a photo-realistic oil painting of the moments when Alabama prevented Penn State from scoring in the Sugar Bowl.

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Alabama vs. Georgia, 50+ years ago: The Saturday Evening Post-Wally Butts-Bear Bryant libel case

January 8, 2018 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, Home, journalism, law, reporting.

More than 50 years ago, the Alabama-Georgia matchup resulted, not in a national championship, but in a legal ruling that expanded the First Amendment protections we now enjoy.

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J. K. Rowling on freedom of expression

September 7, 2017 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: First Amendment, freedom of speech, journalism.

J.K. Rowling has a point of view: Intolerance of alternative viewpoints is spreading to places that make me, a moderate and a liberal, most uncomfortable. Only last year, we saw an online petition to ban Donald Trump from entry to the U.K. It garnered half a million signatures. Just a moment.   I find almost • Read More »

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Seeing Suffrage: Planning the 1913 Washington Woman’s Suffrage Parade

March 11, 2016 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: Alice Paul, First Amendment.

March: Women’s History Month Plans for a gigantic suffrage parade along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., in 1913 began as soon as Alice Paul and Lucy Burns convince the National American Woman Suffrage Association to put them in charge of its Congressional Committee in late November 1912. Paul and Burns, who had been friends since • Read More »

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The First Amendment, Luther Baldwin and the Alien and Sedition Acts

December 21, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: First Amendment, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, Home, journalism education.

University of Tennessee professor Dwight Teeter discusses the case of Luther Baldwin, a New Jersey man who was prosecuted under the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798. Baldwin became a symbol of Federalist intolerance during the 1800 presidential election.

This video is part of the Tennessee Journalism Series and was produced and edited by Jim Stovall.

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How we got the First Amendment (video)

December 17, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: First Amendment, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, history, Home, journalism, journalism education, teaching journalism.

In this two-and-a-half minute video, Dr. Dwight Teeter explains some of the political maneuvering that occurred to get the an amendment guaranteeing freedom of speech into the hotly-debated Constitution in the late 1780s. The freedoms protected by the amendment — religion, speech, press, assembly and petition — were not foremost in the minds of the Founding Fathers. Discussion questions are included with this video.

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Three Dead Americans: Life’s famous World War II photo

November 29, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: Civil War, First Amendment, history, Home, photojournalism.

Americans waited nearly two years before the news media printed a combat photograph that showed a dead U.S. serviceman. The reasons for that wait were that such producing such photos are too shocking for the friends and families of the deceased and that the public’s morale and support for the war might be diminished.

The story of the Life magazine photo is an interesting one and demonstrates the controversy surrounding photographing the deceased, particularly those who have died in combat.

Below is a set of photographs of soldiers killed in battle during the Civil War.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Going Online

May 24, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, teaching journalism.

Designed by the people who helped create and maintain the Interscholastic Online News Network (ISONN), Going Online presents brief, practical lessons in the journalism of today and tomorrow. It shows teaches and students how they can practice journalism on a daily or hourly basis, something they were unable to do before the advent of the World Wide Web.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: The Devil and His Due

May 24, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, teaching journalism.

Many of the things that happened first during the Penny Press era have become the staples of today’s journalism: the dominance of non-partisan news; the emphasis on speed; new areas of reporting, including sports reporting; an expansion of readership to include working classes. The list could go on. Much that is on that list began with James Gordon Bennett.

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Tennessee Journalism Series

May 24, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, Home, teaching journalism.

The Tennessee Journalism Series is a set of texts and instructional material developed by the faculty of the University of Tennessee School of Journalism and Electronic Media for journalism and instructors around the world. The idea behind the series is “multimedia first.” That is, these books are built for the iPad and contain a variety of multimedia elements: text, audio, video, photo galleries, interactive images, and interactive reviews and quizzes.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Media Reporting

May 23, 2013 | By Jim Stovall | No Comments | Filed in: books, First Amendment, reporters, reporting, teaching journalism.

Reporting is hard work. It is frustrating and difficult. Reporters are constantly called upon to use their wit and imagination, to think of where information is and who has it — and then to persuade those who have it to give it up. Reporters do not have subpoena power. They cannot compel sources to part with their information.

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