Category Archives: exercises

Exercise: Editing for the web 04

This editing exercise involves reformulating a story written for print to one for the web. Below on the left is the narrative version of the story. On the right is the form that a web site for which you work uses to introduce the story. We can assume that the full narrative will be somewhere on the site, possibly below it, but as the editor, you need to fill in the parts indicated that will go above it. Do not rewrite the story. Use the information in the story to fill in as much information as you can. You will have to go online to find the links to include.

 

See an example of a completed exercise

 

Resources

 

Writing headlines for the web

 

Writing summaries

Finding links

Editor

(your name; put your name in the form at the end of the exercise, too.)

Headline

Maximum 60 charactersSummary

Maximum 50 words

Major points

At least four bullet points; one complete sentence for each.

Best direct quote

Use this form: Source, attribution.

Best links to other information

(at least three; use the form below)
Web site name, URL, description

Editor

(your name


New technologies help in saving ancient languages

The ancient whistled language of the small island of La Gomera, off the coast of Africa, has been driven to the brink of extinction by new technology and globalization. Now, a 21st-century Web company has taken on the task of saving the language by marrying history with technology.

Silbo Gomero, a language used only on La Gomera Island off the coast of Morocco, sounds to the untrained ear like few other known languages.

The sounds that make up this language, used solely by the residents of the island, part of Spain’s Canary archipelago, are made by whistling, rather than by speaking. The language, which locals say was brought to the islands by African settlers many centuries ago, has been adopted by Spanish colonists over the years.

To communicate among the sparsely populated inland hills and valleys, shepherds perfected the whistle language, which residents say can be heard and understood over distances of up to eight kilometers, compared to about 200 meters for the spoken word.

With the development of new technologies like the cellular phone, the number of Silbo Gomero whistlers has declined to around 1,000. Many of the older generation of islanders fear the language, which they consider to be a cultural heirloom, may become extinct.

But the incursion of modern technology and globalization that threatens this and other endangered languages worldwide may now help to save Silbo Gomero. Busuu.com, a Web site based in Madrid, has launched a campaign to teach Internet users worldwide to communicate using the languages’ unique whistles.

“We really liked the whole story of the Silbo Gomero because it is really a fun language,” said Bernard Niesner, the company’s co-founder. “It is a real language, people really use it there. The same functionalities, the same methodology that we use for teaching Spanish or English, we use it to teach Silbo Gomero.”

Niesner says he and his partner, Adrian Hilti, came up with the idea when searching for an idea for a viral marketing campaign for their company that serves people interested in learning languages interactively. Niesner says one of the founding principles of the Web site was to promote learning languages in danger of extinction.

“If Busuu really works out like we think, it would be an amazing tool for language learning all over the world,” Niesner said. “The name of our Web site itself comes from Busuu, the language from Cameroon, which is spoken by only eight people.”

Niesner says he hopes the worldwide community of Busuu.com users, numbering more than 80,000 in 200 countries, will take up the call to help preserve Silbo Gomero.

(VOANews.com)

Exercise: Editing for the web 03

This editing exercise involves reformulating a story written for print to one for the web. Below on the left is the narrative version of the story. On the right is the form that a web site for which you work uses to introduce the story. We can assume that the full narrative will be somewhere on the site, possibly below it, but as the editor, you need to fill in the parts indicated that will go above it. Do not rewrite the story. Use the information in the story to fill in as much information as you can. You will have to go online to find the links to include.

See an example of a completed exercise

Resources

Writing headlines for the web

Writing summaries

Finding links

Editor

(your name; put your name in the form at the end of the exercise, too.)

Headline

Maximum 60 charactersSummary

Maximum 50 words

Major points

At least four bullet points; one complete sentence for each.

Best direct quote

Use this form: Source, attribution.

Best links to other information

(at least three; use the form below)
Web site name, URL, description

Editor

(your name


One campus struggles with drinking problems

WASHBURN, Michigan — Drinking alcohol is as much a part of   college life as going to the big game or studying all night for exams. But one university town in Michigan, struggling with the recent memories of a student death and campus riot, has taken some unusual steps to challenge the risky rite of passage.

Known as a party school with a tradition rich in distilled spirits, Michigan Southern State University has established a vigorous anti-alcohol campaign, driven in large part by the students. Greek social clubs, often considered bulwarks of campus boozing, have led the way.

At the Lambda Chi House, members of fraternities and sororities recently discussed their support for a voluntary 30-day ban on alcohol at chapter houses. They spoke of the need to “refocus our values” and “understand there’s a problem.”

The “problem” was dramatized last autumn when student Bradley McCue died from alcohol poisoning after a binge at an Washburn bar. Then in May, a student riot broke out, fueled in part by alcohol. Following the incidents, some Greek organizations have sobered up. Phi Delta Theta was hit with an alcohol ban for disciplinary reasons, but the fraternity decided to make the prohibition indefinite.

“Our overall living conditions improved. It was a quieter place to live. Our overall academic (grade point average) went up,” member Bob Graham said.

The temperance movement is widespread. The entire Greek system is considering a permanent ban on alcohol. And some students find refuge in Rather Hall, an alcohol-free dormitory.

“We find alternative things to do like going to the circus,” said Shelly Jamison.

Kourtney Rable doesn’t need to be convinced. The student almost died after draining a   fifth of vodka. “The next thing I remember I was in the hospital, and I had no clue how I got there.”

The town of Washburn has joined the university to reduce the flow of beer, wine and liquor.

Community and business leaders joined students, faculty and administrators to create a team called ACTION. The 33-member group quickly realized it couldn’t wipe out alcohol use completely, so it decided on a narrower target: binge drinkers.

“The 10 percent of the students we have found are drinking about 70 percent of the alcohol,” said ACTION executive director Jinny Haas. One longtime bar owner said binge drinking among the college crowd is the worst he’s seen in his 25 years in business.

“I don’t remember it ever being quite like this,” said Vaughn Schneider. “I think we need to really change the mindset of young people.”

The ACTION group has produced 33 recommendations to increase student awareness. They include supporting students who choose not to drink, providing harm reduction programs for students who drink heavily, and establishing Safe Ride, a bus system to prevent drunk students from driving. Bar and restaurant owners also curbed happy hours and other promotions providing cheap booze.

“We think having a liquor license carries with it a responsibility of public trust,” Schneider said.

Telling others what happened to her, Rable now has a warning for a particular group of students: “The ones that don’t know when to stop. The ones that think passing out is fun.”

She tells them it’s not. They may not wake up.

Exercise: Editing for the web 02

This editing exercise involves reformulating a story written for print to one for the web. Below on the left is the narrative version of the story. On the right is the form that a web site for which you work uses to introduce the story. We can assume that the full narrative will be somewhere on the site, possibly below it, but as the editor, you need to fill in the parts indicated that will go above it. Do not rewrite the story. Use the information in the story to fill in as much information as you can. You will have to go online to find the links to include.

See an example of a completed exercise

Resources

Writing headlines for the web

Writing summaries

Finding links

 

Editor

(your name; put your name in the form at the end of the exercise, too.)

Headline

Maximum 60 charactersSummary

Maximum 50 wordsMajor points

At least four bullet points; one complete sentence for each.
Best direct quote

Use this form: Source, attribution.

Best links to other information

(at least three; use the form below)
Web site name, URL, description

Editor

(your name


Resources

Technicians prepare for Bristol’s “Big Bang”

By Rick Randell
Staff reporter

Technicians were preparing today for Bristol’s version of the “Big Bang,” the implosion that will reduce four dilapidated Bristol Housing Authority high-rises to a massive heap of rubble in a matter of seconds on Saturday.

And officials said they were taking detailed precautions to ensure safety when the blasts go off at 8:20 a.m. Saturday.

The four buildings at Fifteenth Street and Shelby Park Avenue were surrounded by heavy earthen berms and chain-link fences, and police readied a plan to protect neighborhood residents and the hundreds of spectators expected to turn out for the spectacle. Officials advised visiting onlookers to take up positions in a park on the east side of South Shore Drive from 20th to 22nd Streets. Curbside parking was expected to be available west of Freeman Avenue from 11th to 17th Streets.

Police planned to stop northbound South Shore Drive traffic about 27th Street and southbound traffic at Sprat Boulevard for about five minutes at zero hour, even though no debris was expected to escape the blast site.

A safety zone–stretching from Sprat, 23rd Street, the drive and roughly Joseph–was to be closed to all traffic starting at 6 a.m.

“That will allow the Police Department to do final checks,” said Wally Davis, the BHA’s senior manager of development. Officers planned to ensure that all pedestrians were off the streets and out of alleys and that all cars had been removed.

“Our goal on this is total safety,” Washburn said.

After that, a last pre-blast check was planned to account for all authorized people in the zone, including police, fire, demolition and environmental personnel.

Residents in the safety zone were advised to stay inside their homes, with doors and windows closed, until 10 a.m., more than 90 minutes after the implosion.

That was designed to give crews time to sweep and wash away the blanket of dust expected to settle in the area, officials said.

Tarpaulin shields were installed in front of six homes directly across Shelby Park Avenue from the blast site to shield them from the rush of air from the implosion.

From detonation to the crash of the roofs of the four buildings to the ground, the spectacle was expected to last 24 seconds.

A “significant police presence” was planned for the area, Washburn said, and Bristol officers were to be joined by BHA police and private security guards.

Exercise: Editing for the web 01

This editing exercise involves reformulating a story written for print to one for the web. Below on the left is the narrative version of the story. On the right is the form that a web site for which you work uses to introduce the story. We can assume that the full narrative will be somewhere on the site, possibly below it, but as the editor, you need to fill in the parts indicated that will go above it. Do not rewrite the story. Use the information in the story to fill in as much information as you can. You will have to go online to find the links to include.

See an example of a completed exercise

 

Resources

Writing headlines for the web

Writing summaries

Finding links

 

Editor

(your name; put your name in the form at the end of the exercise, too.)

Headline

Maximum 60 charactersSummary

Maximum 50 wordsMajor points

At least four bullet points; one complete sentence for each.

Best direct quote

Use this form: Source, attribution.

Best links to other information

(at least three; use the form below)
Web site name, URL, description

Editor

(your name


Local farmer keeps things buzzing

By Rick Randell
Staff reporter

Chances are, Kelso Gillenwater’s bees have seen more of the country than you have.

Well, they haven’t actually seen the country, but they have probably been through more places than most Blount Countians.

Gillenwater is a local farmer and beekeeper whose family has been keeping bees for four generations.

“My great-grand-daddy had some hives that made the sweetest honey you could imagine,” he said one day last week as he stepped off a forklift. He had just finished loading more than 1,100 hives onto a tractor-trailer truck for their annual trip to sunny California.

Gillenwater still takes honey off his hives, but his main business is no longer extracting honey. Instead, he rents a large portion of his 1,200 hives to almond growers in California, and every year about this time he goes through the same routine. Gillenwater has beehives scattered through Blount, Loudon and Roane counties. He goes around and gathers them up and puts them on a truck for a week-long journey to the almond groves of California.

Gillenwater has been doing this for about nine years.

“My great-grand-daddy never could have imagined this – shipping all these bees to California,” he said. “He never even went to California himself.”

Gillenwater said he makes more money renting his bees out to almond growers than he does extracting the honey.

“Almond growers depend 100 percent on honeybees for pollination,” he said. “If they didn’t have bees, we wouldn’t have almonds.”

The price for renting a hive for about six weeks is $150 per hive.

“There is a shortage of bees in California for this purpose, and they are glad to see my bees coming down the road,” he said.

Gillenwater said his biggest problem is not getting the bees back and forth to California but keeping them alive while they are in East Tennessee. Bees are susceptible to a number of diseases and predators, and they can be hurt by many environmental factors such as insecticides. Gillenwater said he normally loses about 10 to 20 percent of his hives each year.

“That’s pretty standard for most beekeepers in this area,” he said. “The beekeeper who can keep all his hives alive from one year to the next is a pretty luck fellow.

And then there’s the honey.

Gillenwater extracts honey from about 100 of his hives, and he can get anywhere from 50 to 100 pounds of honey off a hive. With honey selling at nearly $1.50 a pound, the money he takes in from is pretty significant.

“It ain’t free money,” he says. He’s right. The extraction process is back-breaking and tedious, but Gillenwater calls it “fun.”

“There’s always a demand for local honey,” he said. “We can sell just about ever bit we pull off the hives.”

 

 

Exercise: Writing headlines and summaries 02

This exercise includes two of the stories in exercise 7.4, page 187, of Writing for the Mass Media (7th ed).

Instructors: The purpose of this exercise is to provide students with some practice in writing headlines and summaries for the web.
Students: Write headlines and summaries for the stories below. You should read Headline writing for the web and Writing summaries here on JPROF.com before starting this exercise.

Refer to the headline and summary tips to the right as you do your work.

No headline can be more than 60 characters long.

You should limit your summaries to about 50 words. You have a maximum of 350 characters in the space allotted for the summary.

Once you start, do not refresh your page while you are working or you may lose your work.


Name

Course Section

Date Instructor

 


Story 1 – Accident at Subway Central

Headline


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

Summary


Characters Left

A restaurant patron died of a heart attack today after an automobile crashed through the front window of the restaurant where he was dining.

John Barker, 59, a resident of the Roaring Creek Community, died at Memorial Hospital. Barker was sitting in the Subway Central Restaurant shortly after noon today when a car crashed through the large plate glass window.

The car was driven by Annie Coulter, 82, of Midville. Police said Coulter reported that the brakes on her car failed as she swerved to avoid a pedestrian. Coulter was hurt in the accident.

Barker was not hit by the car but did receive minor cuts from flying glass. Moments after the accident, however, Barker complained about pains in his chest. He was then taken to Memorial Hospital.

No other injuries were reported


Story 2 – School system restaurant

Headline


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.


Characters Left

After a decade of running The Eatery on State Street, the Ticonderoga County school system has decided to get out of the restaurant business.

The restaurant, where special-education students came during the school day to work and learn about the food-service industry, will close at the end of this school year.

he move will save the school system $20,000 to $50,000 a year, according to school spokesman Randall Styles, whose office in the downtown Franklin Pierce Building is just upstairs from the restaurant.

“It will certainly save us money to close The Eatery,” said Styles, who ate lunch at the conveniently located restaurant almost daily for the past three years. “But it’s something that is not needed anymore because we can provide the same level of instruction at other facilities.”

The school system has relationships with some 80 other Midville-area restaurants, where special-education students can get experience preparing food and waiting on customers, according to Ray Coward, who runs the school program.

Exercise: Writing headlines and summaries 01

This exercise includes two of the stories in exercise 7.3, page 186, of Writing for the Mass Media (7th ed).

Instructors: The purpose of this exercise is to provide students with some practice in writing headlines and summaries for the web. More writing for the web exercises can be found lower on this page.
Students: Write headlines and summaries for the stories below. You should read Headline writing for the web and Writing summaries here on JPROF.com before starting this exercise.

Refer to the headline and summary tips to the right as you do your work.

No headline can be more than 60 characters long.

You should limit your summaries to about 50 words. You have a maximum of 350 characters in the space allotted for the summary.

Once you start, do not refresh your page while you are working or you may lose your work.


Name

Course Section

Date Instructor

 


Story 1 – Dwindling family farms

Headline


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

Summary


Characters Left

Family farms in Ticonderoga County have been dwindling steadily for more than 40 years now, and agricultural officials say there is no comeback in sight.

“Our image is that the family farm is the backbone of America, the ultimate expression of American values,” Jeff Mackey, professor of sociology at Ticonderoga College, said.

“Unfortunately, the family farm is becoming as rare as the dinosaur,” he said.

That is certainly the case in Ticonderoga County, where in 1955 the U.S. Department of Agriculture said there were more than 800 working farms. A farm is defined by the department as land on which $1,000 worth of farm produce was made or could have been made during the year.


Story 2 – New hotel referendum

Headline


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.


Characters Left

Residents of Elizabeth City will be asked in June whether they approve of using public funds for a new downtown hotel and convention center, even though there is no specific recommendation for such a project.

In a technical compliance with a recommendation from the state Department of Elections, the Ticonderoga County Election Commission on Thursday voted to put the referendum on the ballot.

It will be on the June 5 ballot, and only city residents will be able to vote on the question. It will simply ask for a yes or no vote on whether public funds should be used for such a project.

Although City Commission members approved an ordinance to prohibit any public funding for a hotel and convention center shortly after the petition was certified, state Coordinator of Elections Bailey Throckton said the referendum still must be held.

“Putting this on the ballot is appropriate,” Ticonderoga County Commissioner of Elections McKenzie Martin said at Thursday’s meeting of the commission.

Exercise: Headline writing for the web 04

Instructions

Instructors: The purpose of this exercise is to provide students with some practice in writing headlines for the web. Headlines, in the words of Jakob Nielsen, should be “pearls of clarity.

Students: In the spaces on the right, write headlines for the stories below. You should read Headline writing for the web before starting this exercise.

Refer to the headline tips lower on the page as you do your work. If you click on Read more of the story, a new window will open that contains the entire story.

No headline can be more than 50 characters long.

Once you start, do not refresh your page while you are working or you may lose your work.

Story 1 – Wild fire

Two juveniles claimed responsibility Tuesday for a campfire that sparked a three-day fire that raged across southern Ticonderoga County last month.

The boys, ages 14 and 15, came to the sheriff’s office with their parents today and said they believed that it was their campfire that had begun the blaze. They were charged with ignoring sheriff’s safety signs concerning fires and have been released to the custody of their parents.



Story 2 – Leash law

The City Council rejected a proposal Monday that would charge dog owners whose pets bite people with a misdemeanor offense carrying penalties of up to $500 and five days in jail.

After an emotional one-hour debate, the council voted 5-2 against the measure introduced by council member Darden Clarke. Clarke said he has received at least five complaints about dog bites in his district during the past month.



Story 3 – School board

The City School Board named Mike Coleman, principal of Sandy Bar High School in Sandy Bar, La., to the top post at Haraway High School during its Monday meeting.

In a 5-4 vote, the board picked Coleman over Haraway assistant principal Juli McCorvey. Coleman and McCorvey were the finalists in a search that drew more than 40 applicants.



Story 4 – Youth group

Six girls attending a youth group camping trip were found early Sunday after spending the night alone Saturday in near-freezing temperatures at Mount Cheaha State Park.

They were discovered around 8 a.m. Sunday by a park ranger about two miles from where the rest of their party spent the night. The Methodist church group had gone to the park to spend time in the woods. The girls got lost when they took a late afternoon hike on one of the park’s nature trails.

 

Exercise: Headline writing for the web 03

Instructions

Instructors: The purpose of this exercise is to provide students with some practice in writing headlines for the web. Headlines, in the words of Jakob Nielsen, should be “pearls of clarity.

 

Students: In the spaces on the right, write headlines for the stories below. You should read Headline writing for the web before starting this exercise.

Refer to the headline tips lower on the page as you do your work. If you click on Read more of the story, a new window will open that contains the entire story.

No headline can be more than 50 characters long.

Once you start, do not refresh your page while you are working or you may lose your work.

Story 1 – Frat house

A University freshman remains in critical condition at a local hospital suffering from alcohol poisoning after a weekend party at the Alpha Beta Zeta fraternity house.

Al Amalek, a freshman in liberal arts from Nashville, Tenn., was hospitalized this weekend along with two other members of the ABZ fraternity and diagnosed with alcohol poisoning.



Story 2 – Building fire

An early morning blaze gutted the second oldest building in downtown Tuscaloosa, causing nearly $900,000 in damages.

Two firefighters were slightly injured early Monday morning as they battled the fire that destroyed most of the Kress Building at 201 Water Street.



Story 3 – Storm

A violent thunderstorm Sunday night caused flooding, power outages, and at least one traffic accident that injured a local accountant.

Sarah Leigh, an accountant with the Winken, Blinken and Nod accounting firm, was hospitalized with several broken bones after an accident at Main Street and 10th Avenue. She is listed in fair condition at City Memorial Hospital.



Story 4 – Libel

A local jury awarded a $2 million libel judgment against the Daily Tribune Monday in a suit filed by a local businessman.

The jury award $500,000 in damages and $1.5 million in punitive damages to Harvey Segovia, owner of Segovia Lumber Co. Segovia had charged that the newspaper had damaged his reputation in a story about a construction accident two years ago.

Name

Course Section

 

Date

 

Instructor

 

 

 


 

Story 1 – Frat house

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 50 characters for this headline.

 


Story 2 – Building fire

Headline

 


You are limited to 50 characters for this headline.

 


 

Story 3 – Storm

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 50 characters for this headline.

 


 

Story 4 – Libel

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 50 characters for this headline.


Exercise: Headline writing for the web 02

Instructions

Instructors: The purpose of this exercise is to provide students with some practice in writing headlines for the web. Headlines, in the words of Jakob Nielsen, should be “pearls of clarity.

 

Students: In the spaces on the right, write headlines for the stories below. You should read Headline writing for the web before starting this exercise.

Refer to the headline tips lower on the page as you do your work. If you click on Read more of the story, a new window will open that contains the entire story.

No headline can be more than 60 characters long.

Once you start, do not refresh your page while you are working or you may lose your work.

Story 1 – Frat house

A University freshman remains in critical condition at a local hospital suffering from alcohol poisoning after a weekend party at the Alpha Beta Zeta fraternity house.

Al Amalek, a freshman in liberal arts from Nashville, Tenn., was hospitalized this weekend along with two other members of the ABZ fraternity and diagnosed with alcohol poisoning.



Story 2 – Building fire

An early morning blaze gutted the second oldest building in downtown Tuscaloosa, causing nearly $900,000 in damages.

Two firefighters were slightly injured early Monday morning as they battled the fire that destroyed most of the Kress Building at 201 Water Street.



Story 3 – Storm

A violent thunderstorm Sunday night caused flooding, power outages, and at least one traffic accident that injured a local accountant.

Sarah Leigh, an accountant with the Winken, Blinken and Nod accounting firm, was hospitalized with several broken bones after an accident at Main Street and 10th Avenue. She is listed in fair condition at City Memorial Hospital.



Story 4 – Libel

A local jury awarded a $2 million libel judgment against the Daily Tribune Monday in a suit filed by a local businessman.

The jury award $500,000 in damages and $1.5 million in punitive damages to Harvey Segovia, owner of Segovia Lumber Co. Segovia had charged that the newspaper had damaged his reputation in a story about a construction accident two years ago.

Name

Course Section

 

Date

 

Instructor

 

 

 


 

Story 1 – Frat house

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

 


Story 2 – Building fire

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

 


 

Story 3 – Storm

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

 


 

Story 4 – Libel

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.


Exercise: Headline writing for the web 01

Instructions

Instructors: The purpose of this exercise is to provide students with some practice in writing headlines for the web. Headlines, in the words of Jakob Nielsen, should be “pearls of clarity.

Students: In the spaces on the right, write headlines for the stories below. You should read Headline writing for the web before starting this exercise.

Refer to the headline tips lower on the page as you do your work. If you click on Read more of the story, a new window will open that contains the entire story.

No headline can be more than 60 characters long.

Once you start, do not refresh your page while you are working or you may lose your work.

Story 1 – Wild fire

Two juveniles claimed responsibility Tuesday for a campfire that sparked a three-day fire that raged across southern Ticonderoga County last month.

The boys, ages 14 and 15, came to the sheriff’s office with their parents today and said they believed that it was their campfire that had begun the blaze. They were charged with ignoring sheriff’s safety signs concerning fires and have been released to the custody of their parents.



Story 2 – Leash law

The City Council rejected a proposal Monday that would charge dog owners whose pets bite people with a misdemeanor offense carrying penalties of up to $500 and five days in jail.

After an emotional one-hour debate, the council voted 5-2 against the measure introduced by council member Darden Clarke. Clarke said he has received at least five complaints about dog bites in his district during the past month.



Story 3 – School board

The City School Board named Mike Coleman, principal of Sandy Bar High School in Sandy Bar, La., to the top post at Haraway High School during its Monday meeting.

In a 5-4 vote, the board picked Coleman over Haraway assistant principal Juli McCorvey. Coleman and McCorvey were the finalists in a search that drew more than 40 applicants.



Story 4 – Youth group

Six girls attending a youth group camping trip were found early Sunday after spending the night alone Saturday in near-freezing temperatures at Mount Cheaha State Park.

They were discovered around 8 a.m. Sunday by a park ranger about two miles from where the rest of their party spent the night. The Methodist church group had gone to the park to spend time in the woods. The girls got lost when they took a late afternoon hike on one of the park’s nature trails.

Name

Course Section

 

Date

 

Instructor

 

 

 


 

Story 1 – Wild fire

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

 


Story 2 – Leash law

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

 


 

Story 3 – School board

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.

 


 

Story 4 – Youth group

 

Headline

 


You are limited to 60 characters for this headline.


Exercise: Learning HTML tags 02

Name

Course Section

Date

Instructor

 



1. I can’t decide whether I should go to California or Florida.

Insert bold tags for the names of the states. Type the entire sentence.

 

2. To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee of Monroeville, Ala.

Insert italic tags for the title of the book. Type the entire sentence.

 

3. Despite his profound effect on the English language, relatively little is known about William Shakespeare.

Insert an image tag after the sentence. The URL for the image is http://www.jprof.com/images/shakespeare.jpg. Type the entire sentence.

 

4. My father once told me that George Washington slept here.

Make the words “George Washington” into a link. Here is the URL you can use: http://www.pbs.org/georgewashington/. Type the entire sentence.

 

5. No one wanted to have pizza tonight.

Put a paragraph tag at the end of the sentence. Type the entire sentence.

 

6. The Pulitzer Prize winner spoke for more than an hour. “A reporter must always identify himself,” he said.

Make the second sentence, including the direct quote and the attribution, into a block quote. Type both sentences.

7. The St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series in 2006.

Make the words “St. Louis Cardinals” into a link. You will need to look up a good web site about the Cardinals and use the URL from that site.

 

8. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy is one of the most famous books ever written.

Make the title of the book both bold and italic. Type the entire sentence

9. Nobody knows the trouble I’ve seen.

Center this sentence on the web page. Type the entire sentence

10. New York City is one of the most exciting places I have ever been.

Bold the words “New York City” and make them into a link. You will need to look up a good web site for the city. Type the entire sentence

Name
Type your name again so it will appear on the second page when you print it out.

Print this page

Exercise: Learning HTML tags 01

Name

Course
Section

Date

Instructor

 



1. I can’t decide whether I should go to California or Florida.

Insert bold tags for the names of the states. Type the entire sentence.

 

2. To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee of Monroeville, Ala.

Insert italic tags for the title of the book. Type the entire sentence.

 

3. Despite his profound effect on the English language, relatively little is known about William Shakespeare.

Insert an image tag after the sentence. The URL for the image is http://www.jprof.com/images/shakespeare.jpg. Type the entire sentence.

 

4. My father once told me that George Washington slept here.

Make the words “George Washington” into a link. Here is the URL you can use: http://www.pbs.org/georgewashington/. Type the entire sentence.

 

5. No one wanted to have pizza tonight.

Put a paragraph tag at the end of the sentence. Type the entire sentence.

 

6. The Pulitzer Prize winner spoke for more than an hour. “A reporter must always identify himself,” he said.

Make the second sentence, including the direct quote and the attribution, into a block quote. Type both sentences.

7. The St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series in 2006.

Make the words “St. Louis Cardinals” into a link. You will need to look up a good web site about the Cardinals and use the URL from that site.

 

8. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy is one of the most famous books ever written.

Make the title of the book both bold and italic. Type the entire sentence

9. Nobody knows the trouble I’ve seen.

Center this sentence on the web page. Type the entire sentence

10. New York City is one of the most exciting places I have ever been.

Bold the words “New York City” and make them into a link. You will need to look up a good web site for the city. Type the entire sentence

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Answers: Subject-verb agreement 04

1. The mass media have become pervasive in our society.

Media is another of those words that has maintained its Latin origin. This is the plural form and should have a plural verb. The singular form of media is medium.

2. The president and his advisor was up early to deal with the crisis.

Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “and” usually take plural verbs. The verb in this sentence should be “were.”

3. Measles has a deathly grip on the children of this town.

“Measles” is a word that appears to be plural but is actually singular. In this sentence, the verb “has” is correct.

4. The hammer and one of the nails was laying there ready for the carpenter.

Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “and” usually take plural verbs. The words “hammer” and “one” are the subjects of this sentence, and the verb should be “were.”

5. Through the roaring blazes of the many fires runs John.

This type of sentence is sometimes called an inverted sentence – one in which the verb comes before the subject. Still, the subject and verb must agree, and in this case they do.

6. All of the clocks in the city strike at about the same time.

The subject of this sentence is “all,” which usually takes a plural verb. In this case, “strike” is the correct verb.

7. Despite the fact that each was told not to, the three-year-old Grant and the five-year-old Owen wants to play in the mud.

Each of the subjects in this sentence is singular, and they each have plural verbs.

8. Two-thirds of the assignment has been finished.

Fractions used as subjects in a sentence may be either singular or plural. They are singular when they refer to a unit as a whole; they are plural when they refer to individual members of the unit. For instance, in the case above, the sentence, “Two-thirds of the problems have been fiished,” is correct.

9. News is what editors and news directors say it is.

The word “news” is singular even though it appears to be plural in form.

10. The pile of logs, all of them, were stolen in the middle of the night.

The subject of this sentence is “pile,” not “logs” or “all.” Therefore, it needs the singular verb “was” instead of “were.”

Exercise: Subject-verb agreement 04


This exercise consists of 10 sentences. For each sentence you should decide if the subject agrees with the verb. If so, type the word “Correct” in the space below the sentence; if not, write the sentence correctly in the box below it. Follow the directions of your instructor in completing this exercise. A link appears at the end of the sentences that gives an explanation for each sentence.
1. The mass media have become pervasive in our society.2. The president and his advisor was up early to deal with the crisis.

3. Measles has a deathly grip on the children of this town.

4. The hammer and one of the nails was laying there ready for the carpenter.

5. Through the roaring blazes of the many fires runs John.

6. All of the clocks in the city strike at about the same time.

7. Despite the fact that each was told not to, the three-year-old Grant and the five-year-old Owen wants to play in the mud.

8. Two-thirds of the assignment has been finished.

9. News is what editors and news directors say it is.

10. The pile of logs, all of them, were stolen in the middle of the night.

When you have finished this exercise, follow the directions of your instructor for printing or saving your work.

Answers and explanations

Answers: Subject-verb agreement 03

Subject-verb agreement exercise 03

1. Laughter and joy always punctuate the child’s shrieks.

Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “and” usually take plural verbs. In this sentence, “laughter” and “joy” are the subjects of the sentence.

2. Neither the team nor the coach was satisfied with the victory.

Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “or” or in the constructions “either . . . or” and “neither . . . nor” usually take singular verbs.

3. Marching and singing were two of the staple activities of the civil rights movement in the 1960s.

Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “and” usually take plural verbs. In this sentence, two gerunds (words in verb form that are used as nouns) are the subjects of the sentence.

4. The Surpreme Court close its session today.

“Supreme Court” is the subject of this sentence. Although it refers to nine individuals, the term is singular because it refers to the unit as a whole.

5. There was loud noise and music coming from inside the house.

When you see sentences that begin with “there” or “it” and a linking verb, you must look past the verb to find the subject of the sentence. In this instance, “noise” and “music” are the compound subjects of this sentence, and the verb should be “were.”

6. Politics is what he enjoys the most.

“Politics” is one of those words that can be singular or plural depending on the context of the sentence. In this case, it is singular because it refers to a set of activities and situations rather than the individual activities themselves.

7. The data do not support his conclusions.

Some words retain their Latin origins. Data and media are two such words. Although they are often used as singular nouns, they are plural and should be used with plural verbs. The verb here is correctly “do,” not “does.”

8. Large amounts of free time was one of the difficulties with the job.

The subject of this sentence is “amounts,” a plural noun, not “time,” a singular noun. The verb should be “were” instead of “was.”

9. Intercollegiate athletics has a large budget at this university.

“Athletics” is one of those words that looks like it is plural, but it is really a singular noun most of the time. In this case it is referring to a set of sports, not individual sports.

10. “Silver Bells” are among my favorite Christmas songs.

Titles of books, movies and other works should be treated as singular nouns even though they may be plural in form. The verb in this sentence should be “is” rather than “are.”

Exercise: Subject-verb agreement 03

Name

This exercise consists of 10 sentences. For each sentence you should decide if the subject agrees with the verb. If so, type the word “Correct” in the space below the sentence; if not, write the sentence correctly in the box below it. Follow the directions of your instructor in completing this exercise. A link appears at the end of the sentences that gives an explanation for each sentence.

1. Laughter and joy always punctuate the child’s shrieks.

2. Neither the team nor the coach was satisfied with the victory.

3. Marching and singing were two of the staple activities of the civil rights movement in the 1960s.

4. The Surpreme Court close its session today.

5. There was loud noise and music coming from inside the house.

6. Politics is what he enjoys the most.

7. The data do not support his conclusions.

8. Large amounts of free time was one of the difficulties with the job.

9. Intercollegiate athletics has a large budget at this university.

10. “Silver Bells” are among my favorite Christmas songs.

When you have finished this exercise, follow the directions of your instructor for printing or saving your work.

Answers and explanations

Answers: Subject-verb agreement 02

1. Either of the two boys have the ability to make the team.

Words such as none, anyone, everybody, each, either, neither and one are singular when used as subjects in a sentence. In this case, either is the subject of the sentence, not boys. The verb “have” is incorrect; it should be “has.”

2. The committee members meet once a month to try to determine the policies of the organization.

This sentence has a plural subject, members, and there it must take the plural form of the verb. Remember that unlike most nouns, most verbs taken their plural form by adding an “s.”

3. The babies in the nursery, and one in particular, was crying for some attention.

The subject in this sentence is babies, but the verb, was, is singular. The verb should be were.

4. The politics of the committee were such that no one could be elected chair of the group.

Some words can be either singular or plural depending on their context. The writer must decide which is the proper use. Politics is one of those words. Here the writer is referring to a variety of situations that constitute the workings of the group.

5. A bizarre series of incidents has surrounded that old house lately.

Despite its plural form, the word “series” is a singular noun. The verb should be “has” rather than “have.”

6. The president jogged by the group of tourists who were gaping out the window of the bus.

In this sentence, the phrase “who were gaping out the wind of the bus” is a dependent clause, but it contains the subject “who.” The question is, to what does the “who” refer – the “group” or the “tourists.” In this case, it is the “tourists;” consequently, the “who” should take a plural verb.

7. A wide variety of strategic reasons have been used to explain Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo.

The subject of this sentence is “variety,” a singular noun. The verb should also be singular – “has,” rather than “have.”

8. Incidents of alcohol abuse account for many traffic fatalities each year.

The subject of this sentence, “Incidents,” requires the plural form of the verb, “account.”

9. Few of the senators were on hand for the vote.

The word “few,” even though singular in appearance, is considered a plural and should take a plural verb. Few refers to the individuals in a group rather than to a group itself.

10. The most resilient among the war’s survivors were the children.

In this sentence “resilient” is an adjective that appears to be replacing some noun – possibly “survivors” – as the subject of the sentence. Whatever the noun, it is obviously plural, and consequently, the verb should also be plural.

Exercise: Subject-verb agreement 02

This exercise consists of 10 sentences. For each sentence you should decide if the subject agrees with the verb. If so, type the word “Correct” in the space below the sentence; if not, write the sentence correctly in the box below it. Follow the directions of your instructor in completing this exercise. A link appears at the end of the sentences that gives an explanation for each sentence.


1. Either of the two boys have the ability to make the team.

2. The committee members meet once a month to try to determine the policies of the organization.

3. The babies in the nursery, and one in particular, was crying for some attention.

4. The politics of the committee were such that no one could be elected chair of the group.

5. A bizarre series of incidents has surrounded that old house lately.

6. The president jogged by the group of tourists who were gaping out the window of the bus.

7. A wide variety of strategic reasons have been used to explain Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo.

8. Incidents of alcohol abuse account for many traffic fatalities each year.

9. Few of the senators were on hand for the vote.

10. The most resilient among the war’s survivors were the children.

When you have finished this exercise, follow the directions of your instructor for printing or saving your work.

Answers and explanations

Answers: Subject-verb agreement 01

Subject-verb agreement exercise 01

1. None of the members of the first team are playing in the fourth quarter.

Words such as none, anyone, everybody, each, either, neither and one are singular when used as subjects in a sentence. In this case, none is the subject of the sentence, not members. The verb “are” is incorrect; it should be “is.”

2. The family was gathering from around the country for the funeral.

The noun family is a collective noun. Collective nouns refer to a group of things or people as a unit. Some other examples of such words are class, committee, team, number, majority, group, herd and jury. When these words are used as subjects and denote the unit as a whole, they are singular and take singular verbs.

3. Today’s news media is generally considered to be politically liberal.

Some words retain their Latin origins. “Media” is such a word. “Data” is another word of this kind. Although they are often used as singular nouns, they are plural and should be used with plural verbs. “Media” is plural for “medium,” and the verb should be “are” rather than “is.”

4. Rachel, despite everyone’s best efforts, was not able to pass the test.

The subject of the sentence is Rachel, not efforts. The verb is correct.

5. Present at the ceremoney was the big league pitcher Mike O’Kelley and his brother Robert.

This sentence has a compound subject – Mike O’Kelley and Robert. Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “and” usually take plural verbs. The verb should be “were” rather than “was.” Don’t be fooled by the fact that the subject comes after the verb rather than before it.

6. Thelma and Louise, the movie, make some telling points about women in our society.

Titles of books, movies and other works should be treated as singular nouns even though they may be plural in form. In this case Thelma and Louise is the title of the move and should be treated as a singular noun. The verb should be “makes” instead of “make.”

7. Everyone, even the smartest ones among us, has a bad day now and then.

Words such as everyone, none, anyone, everybody, each, either, neiher and one are singular when used as subjects in a sentence. Don’t be fooled by the plural nouns in the parenthetical phrase that follows the subject.

8. Either her doctor or her lawyer has a standing appointment to visit her every morning.

Compound subjects joined by the conjunction “or” or in the constructions “either . . . or” and “neither . . . nor” usually take singular verbs.

9. “Ty Cobb plays baseball with fire in his belly,” one of his contemporaries said.

“Ty Cobb” is a singular subject and properly takes a singular subject – in this instance, “plays.”

10. Both Mary and Joan play the piano with ease and grace.

This sentence has a compound subject that is joined by the conjunction “and.” The subject thus requires a plural verb.

Exercise: Subject-verb agreement 01

Name
This exercise consists of 10 sentences. For each sentence you should decide if the subject agrees with the verb. If so, type the word “Correct” in the space below the sentence; if not, write the sentence correctly in the box below it. Follow the directions of your instructor in completing this exercise. A link appears at the end of the sentences that gives an explanation for each sentence. 

1. None of the members of the first team are playing in the fourth quarter.

2. The family was gathering from around the country for the funeral.

3. Today’s news media is generally considered to be politically liberal.

4. Rachel, despite everyone’s best efforts, was not able to pass the test.

5. Present at the ceremony was the big league pitcher Mike O’Kelley and his brother Robert.

6. Thelma and Louise, the movie, make some telling points about women in our society.

7. Everyone, even the smartest ones among us, has a bad day now and then.

8. Either her doctor or her lawyer has a standing appointment to visit her every morning.

9. “Ty Cobb plays baseball with fire in his belly,” one of his contemporaries said.

10. Both Mary and Joan play the piano with ease and grace.

When you have finished this exercise, follow the directions of your instructor for printing or saving your work.

Answers and explanations