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Vietnam Voices – Managing the war

Episode Summary Timothy Lomperis served in military intelligence in Vietnam. Lt. Lomperis served two tours in Vietnam, beginning in March 1972. His initial position was as an intelligence analyst. He saw first-hand during briefs the tensions between the Army and the Air Force over the conduct of the war. He subsequently served in a variety […]

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JohnLecarre

What they are saying about John le Carré

With the publication of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold in 1963, John le Carré redirected the genre of espionage fiction away from the fanciful world of James Bond to the moral grayness of people such as Alec Leamas and ultimately George Smiley. And while James Bond was lots of fun, George Smiley […]

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Vietnam Voices – Building roads in Vietnam

Episode Summary As a member of the Army’s Corps of Engineers, Richard Chandler built roads while in Vietnam in 1971 and 1972. Some of those roads were the basis for today’s interstate system in Vietnam.   Episode Notes Richard Chandler was a captain in the Army Corp of Engineers, serving in Vietnam from October 1971 […]

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RebeccaHardingDavis

Rebecca Harding Davis and the beginnings of American realism

If you know anything about journalism history, you probably know the name Richard Harding Davis. He was a reporter in the early 20th century known for his coverage of the Spanish-American Wa, the Boer War, and the beginnings of World War I. He was also one of the most handsome men of his day. His […]

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Vietnam Voices – On the deck of a carrier

Episode Summary Robert Jones was an electronics technician for the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Intrepid during the Navy’s Rolling Thunder campaign in 1968. He volunteered for flight deck duty because “that’s where the action was.”   Episode Notes Robert Jones was a petty officer, first class, serving in an air attack squadron aboard the […]

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Vietnam Voices – Peace Corps with a rifle

Episode Summary Most of the armed servicemen in Vietnam were in non-combat roles. One was Buddy Mitchell, who found himself in the “Peace Corps with a gun.”   Episode Notes Horace “Buddy” Mitchelll served in Vietnam June 1969 to June 1970  in the First Air Cavalry.    He was an artillery sergeant in the Fire […]

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More pages from the caricature sketchbooks (part 2)

More pages from the sketchbooks As promised last week, I am showing you some of the pages from my caricatures sketchbooks in these December newsletters. You can see the pages displayed last week here.  

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A look inside my caricature sketchbooks (part 1)

Most artists (and people like me who are working at it) keep a sketchbook. It’s a place where they can try out ideas that they may have to bring to fruition on a canvas or a piece of watercolor paper. As such, sketchbooks are not generally considered things for public viewing. A lot of what […]

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Playing the cello2

The woman at the start of American realism, the women of Edward Hoch, and the death of Erskine Childers: newsletter, December 11, 2020

This newsletter was sent to everyone on Jim’s email list (2,4xx) on Friday, December 11, 2020. No room in the inn. Anyone familiar with the Christmas nativity story has heard the phrase “no room in the inn.“ The phrase is a short explanation for why Jesus was born in a stable, but over the centuries […]

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Erskine Childers

Erskine Childers and the espionage novel, sketchbooks, and reader reaction: newsletter, December 4, 2020

This newsletter was sent to everyone on Jim’s email list (2,4xx) on Friday, December 4, 2020. When I was a child I was given piano lessons, but I didn’t take to that instrument very well. After a few years, I stopped, but my mother believed that I should continue to have music lessons of some […]

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Erskine Childers’ extraordinary life and death (part 2)

After the publication of The Riddle of the Sands in 1903, Erskine Childers could have settled in to a literary and possibly a political life in London. The book had achieved astonishing success and popularity. The book had also become an important part of the ongoing debate in England at the time about the nation’s […]

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VV-cover-front

Vietnam Voices – This is not a game

Episode Summary Marine Corporal Anthony Joyce describes being out on patrol with his unit soon after getting to Vietnam and realizing that people in the jungle are trying to hurt or kill him and his buddies. Episode Notes Corporal Anthony “Tony” Joyce was with the 1st Battalion 3rd Marines, 3rd Marine Division, 1964-1965. It was […]

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VV-cover-front

Vietnam Voices – Somebody shouted ‘in-coming!’

Episode Summary Marine Captain Jerry Cunningham was assigned to the Marine’s JAG Corps during his tour in Vietnam, but he was rarely far from danger. Episode Notes Even when you were in a non-combat position, you always had to be ready to respond to danger when you were in Vietnam. That’s what Jerry Cunningham found […]

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Erskine Childers, an important life and a shocking death (part 1)

Erskine Childers was an English-Irish author and adventurer. As both an author and an adventurer, he lived a life that could be envied. As an adventurer, he began as an English imperialist but became involved with Irish Republicanism and helped the Irish fight against the English. As a writer, he penned a novel that is […]

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VV-cover-front

Vietnam Voices – Attack pilot

Episode Summary Bill Beaty, an attack pilot in the U.S. Navy, tells what it was like to fly bombing missions over North Vietnam in 1970. “I got shot at a lot,” he says. Episode Notes William Beaty retired from the U.S. Navy as a Naval Aviator, serving in-country from November 1970 to June 1971.  He […]

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Charles Lindbergh

Unity and the lack thereof – American style

In the immediate aftermath of political campaigns, the winner (and sometimes even the loser) appeals for “unity,” which often means in real-speak, “I want you to agree with me now that I am in power.” Such appeals, possibly well-meant, rarely have much effect on either supporters or opponents. But it sounds good, and it’s expected. […]

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A look inside my caricatures sketchbooks

Most artists (and people like me who are working at it) keep a sketchbook. It’s a place where they can try out ideas that they may have to bring to fruition on a canvas or a piece of watercolor paper. As such, sketchbooks are not generally considered things for public viewing. A lot of what […]

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The flute player

Ed Hoch’s short stories, another presidential memoir, and something new from Vietnam Voices: newsletter, November 27, 2020

This newsletter was sent to everyone on Jim’s email list (2,489) on Friday, November 27, 2020. The small farm where I live is blessed with hundreds of feet of fencerows. They stretch past the barn and around the pasture and by the garden. And they have been neglected for many years. That means that the […]

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Richard Tregaskis

Richard Tregaskis, the tall guy on Guadalcanal

The Marines that he wrote about on Guadalcanal would tell Richard Tregaskis that if the Japanese captured him, they would probably use him as an “observation post.” They weren’t far from wrong. Tregaskis, a reporter during World War II for the International News Service, was six-feet, seven-inches tall — tall enough to be an observation […]

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Paul Scofield

Thomas More and Thomas Cromwell: the shifting literary views of each man

Few historical figures can claim as many major literary executions and resurrections as Thomas More, venerated saint of the Roman Catholic Church, who was, in real life, executed by Henry VIII in 1536 for his refusal to sign the Oath of Supremacy. That oath would have acknowledged the king, rather than the Pope, as head of the […]

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