Test 1

 

The first test of the lecture section for JEM 200 will take place sometime around Week 8 of the semester.

The test will be a 50-question, multiple-choice exam. The test will include all of the chapters assigned in Writing for the Mass Media (chapters 1-5, 7 and 10), plus anything in the lecture notes and anything said during the lecture sessions.

IMPORTANT: The test will be given on the Blackboard site for the lecture section of JEM 200. Be sure to bring a computer or device that can connect to Blackboard.

The test will count for 10 percent of the final grade in JEM 200.

You are in good shape with all of this if you have attended all of the lectures, paid attention, read the chapters and carefully read the lecture notes. You are in great shape if you have done this and tweeted the lecture.

If you have any questions about this test, feel free to ask during any lecture session.

 

Additional articles to read

In addition, I would like for you to read the following short articles about writing. (I have included the title and first couple of paragraphs below.) I think that you will find them enjoyable and enlightening.

The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative

By CONSTANCE HALE
I like to imagine a sentence as a boat. Each sentence, after all, has a distinct shape, and it comes with something that makes it move forward or stay still — whether a sail, a motor or a pair of oars. There are as many kinds of sentences as there are seaworthy vessels: canoes and sloops, barges and battleships, Mississippi riverboats and dinghies all-too-prone to leaks. And then there are the impostors, flotsam and jetsam — a log heading downstream, say, or a coconut bobbing in the waves without a particular destination.
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/19/the-sentence-as-a-miniature-narrative/

Make-or-Break Verbs

By CONSTANCE HALE
A sentence can offer a moment of quiet, it can crackle with energy or it can just lie there, listless and uninteresting.
What makes the difference? The verb.
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/16/make-or-break-verbs/

Sentences Crisp, Sassy, Stirring

By CONSTANCE HALE
Gabriel García Márquez writes unhurried sentences that almost defy parsing. William Faulkner wrote a nearly 1,300-word sentence that ended up in Guinness World Records, but he used the five words “My mother is a fish” as a complete chapter of a book. Joan Didion can stop us short with simple truths, and she can take us on strolls down labyrinthine corridors.
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/28/sentences-crisp-sassy-stirring/

The Sound of a Sentence

By CONSTANCE HALE
At the top of my list of favorite children’s books is “Goodnight Moon,” with its soft lines and easy rhymes (Goodnight stars/ Goodnight air/ Goodnight noises everywhere). I never tire of the story, no matter how many children I read it to. My other favorite is “Green Eggs and Ham,” with its topsy-turvy sentences (I am Sam. Sam I am.) and subversive humor (And I will eat them in the rain. And in the dark. And on a train.).
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/11/the-sound-of-a-sentence/

Sample questions

What is the AP style rule concerning numbers?
a. Use figures for numbers over 100.
b. Use figures for numbers zero through nine.
c. Spell out number zero through nine; use figures for numbers greater than nine.

The strongest words in the English language are
a. nouns and verbs
b. adjectives and adverbs
c. prepositions and conjunctions
d. interjections and pronouns

Clichés were once out of fashion with most writers, but now they are generally accepted as promoting clear, fresh writing.
True or False.

The underlined phrase in the following sentence is an example of what?
John, my brother, left home for the Army.
a. preposition
b. gerund
c. appositive

What kind of error is contained in the sentence below?
The Supreme Court issued their opinion on the case yesterday.
a. Cliché
b. Spelling error
c. Error in agreement
d. Redundancy
e. Punctuation error


Rules for using commas

Learn all the basic rules for using commas at this page on JPROF.