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E.B. White

E.B. White on a writer’s responsibility

One of the great writers — a true craftsman — of the the 20th century, E.B. White, had this to say on the responsibility that writers have: “A writer should concern himself with whatever absorbs his fancy, stirs his heart, and unlimbers his typewriter. I feel no obligation to deal with politics. I do feel […]

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Mountain View UMC, watercolor

In which I answer the question “What’s next?”, part 1

Not that there is a wildfire of burning interest about this topic out there. Most folks, I suspect, will shrug, and if they think anything at all, they will think, “Well, it’s about time.”

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punctred

Happy birthday, JPROF.com

The image I had for JPROF.com during those first weeks was as a giant filing cabinet for information and resources I was gathering about journalism education and how to teach journalism. Journalism: Who, What, When, Where, Why and How had just been published by Allyn and Bacon, and I thought there might be a second […]

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words

Writing good tags should be part of the journalist’s writing process

At minimum, tags should include • all of the proper names and places referred to in your story; • major ideas and concepts of the subject of the story: • important actions and processes referred to in the story.

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dwight

How we got the First Amendment (video)

In this two-and-a-half minute video, Dr. Dwight Teeter explains some of the political maneuvering that occurred to get the an amendment guaranteeing freedom of speech into the hotly-debated Constitution in the late 1780s. The freedoms protected by the amendment — religion, speech, press, assembly and petition — were not foremost in the minds of the […]

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DF-ST-92-02571

The web imposes new responsibilities on journalists

The web has imposed new responsibilities on the journalist – responsibilities that go far beyond those of the traditional print or broadcast reporter.

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Creating an interactive chart with Google Spreadsheets (video)

How do you make an interactive chart like this one and put it onto your web page? The video on this page will explain it all.

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The sliderule analogy

The analogy between teaching journalism and teaching mathematics is just about perfect. But there’s a problem.

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Going online: What I tell high school teachers and students

A news website gives scholastic journalists the opportunity to do something they’ve never done — practice “daily journalism.”

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Teaching AP style: some high school teachers weigh in

Some high school teachers tell how they teach AP style to their students. And here’s what adherence to style brings to your writing:

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Coming Fall 2013: iBooks on your Mac

For those of us who produce multimedia books with iBooks Author, the implications and possibilities are huge.

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Chicago Sun-Times fires its photojournalists

A fellow journalism educator at another university said he wasn’t surprised and that last year he had begun requiring his reporting students to learn how to use a camera. Last year?

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Photojournalism: Telling Stories with Pictures and Words

This book introduces students to the basic principles of photojournalism and to concepts such as the rule-of-thirds, cropping and editing, the value of the close-up, and the talent of seeing what other people do not see.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Writing Like a Journalist

Journalists write for a living. They use words precisely and efficiently. They present accurate, verified information in a way that a mass audience will understand it by reading or hearing it only once.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Going Online

Designed by the people who helped create and maintain the Interscholastic Online News Network (ISONN), Going Online presents brief, practical lessons in the journalism of today and tomorrow. It shows teaches and students how they can practice journalism on a daily or hourly basis, something they were unable to do before the advent of the […]

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Feature Writing

Feature Writing presents the basic concepts and techniques of feature writing for students who want to explore this vital part of journalism. It is brief and designed to be highly accessible to the beginning student.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: The Devil and His Due

Many of the things that happened first during the Penny Press era have become the staples of today’s journalism: the dominance of non-partisan news; the emphasis on speed; new areas of reporting, including sports reporting; an expansion of readership to include working classes. The list could go on. Much that is on that list began […]

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Tennessee Journalism Series

The Tennessee Journalism Series is a set of texts and instructional material developed by the faculty of the University of Tennessee School of Journalism and Electronic Media for journalism and instructors around the world. The idea behind the series is “multimedia first.” That is, these books are built for the iPad and contain a variety […]

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Tennessee Journalism Series: The First Amendment

The First Amendment is one of the most important legal and social documents in American history. Its meaning remains the center of much controversy, debate and litigation even after 200 years.

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Media Reporting

Reporting is hard work. It is frustrating and difficult. Reporters are constantly called upon to use their wit and imagination, to think of where information is and who has it — and then to persuade those who have it to give it up. Reporters do not have subpoena power. They cannot compel sources to part […]

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