Archive | reporting RSS feed for this section
th

7 reasons why you should encourage your students to tweet your lectures

Some professors ban laptops, tablets and smart phones from their classrooms, seeing them as distractions for their students. Instead, they should welcome them as tools for engagement.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Going online: What I tell high school teachers and students

A news website gives scholastic journalists the opportunity to do something they’ve never done — practice “daily journalism.”

Read full story Comments { 0 }
JKFreadingnewspaper-1

John F. Kennedy on the importance of open government (audio)

In April 1961, a few months after taking office as president of the United States, John F. Kennedy spoke to the American Newspaper Publishers Association about the importance of maintaining an open government. In the speech he said, “The very word ‘secrecy’ is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Tennessee Journalism Series: Media Reporting

Reporting is hard work. It is frustrating and difficult. Reporters are constantly called upon to use their wit and imagination, to think of where information is and who has it — and then to persuade those who have it to give it up. Reporters do not have subpoena power. They cannot compel sources to part […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Obiturary stories

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Speech stories

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Do reporters have more fun?

Chapter 8 in Journalism: Who, What, When, Where, Why and How emphasizes how difficult it is to be a reporter. That’s certainly true. But it’s also fun.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Changing quotations

One of the continuing practical problems that arises often in the nation’s newsrooms is how to handle direct quotations.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Plagiarism

Students sometimes get mixed up about what constitutes plagiarism, but journalists should never let that happen. They should understand that plagiarism is one of the worst things they can do, and they should know how to avoid it.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Math help for journalists

Many journalists say (sometimes jokingly, sometimes not) that they got into the profession because they would not have to deal with a lot of math. For most working reporters, however, that turns out not to be the case.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Context in reporting

One of the criticisms of journalism is that reporters report events as events only, rather than giving them any context.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Writing an obit

For generations, the journalism culture demanded that young reporters cut their teeth on obituary stories – “writing obits,” we would say. The thinking was that obituaries were easy to write and possibly not very interesting or important.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Reporting religion

Religion and religious topics are not particularly welcomed in a newsroom. That is why years such as 2004, when religion is a big part of some of the year’s biggest stories (gay marriage, the presidential election, Mel Gibson’s movie “The Passion of Christ,” etc.) are tough for journalists. Why then are editors and news directors […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The ‘essentially accurate’ standard

Abraham Lincoln began the Gettysburg Address with the words, “About a century ago, the dudes that started it all . . .” Well, ok. Those weren’t exactly the words, but they are “essentially accurate.” That’s the standard that Detroit Free Press sportswriter Mitch Albom imposed upon himself in handling direct quotations for his column. Apparently, […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Women as news sources

That is the basic finding of a new study conducted by the Project for Excellence in Journalism and funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts. The basic finding is probably not surprising, but what is impressive and important is how widespread and consistent is the tendency of journalists to use men rather than women as sources […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The Numbers Guy

Numbers are funny things — especially for journalists. They sound so definite and authoritative. Numbers represent facts in a seemingly indisputable way. They are easy to use and easy to understand. But numbers should always be checked for context and source. One journalist who regularly examines the source and context of numbers is Carl Bailik, […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

First reporting assignment: a preview story

It’s the first week of class in your reporting class. Your students are bright and eager — and they don’t have a clue about what they are supposed to do. You want to get them into the field quickly, but you’re afraid (rightly so) to unleash them on an unsuspecting campus. The solution: a preview […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The center of gravity has shifted

The web has pretty much rendered obsolete the adage that says you should never pick a fight with a man who buys ink by the barrel and newsprint by the ton. Today there is less fear and frustration with the news media on the part of those outside the profession, and there is more willingness […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Bonds hoisted on his own Louisville slugger?

It would be a reporter’s dream: Barry Bonds answering questions under oath — with two reporters in the room. That could be one of the outcomes of the suit that San Francisco Giant Barry Bonds has filed against Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, two San Francisco Chronicle reporters who have written a book about Bonds’ […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Gay Talese, a reporter’s life

For decades now, readers and critics have focused on Gay Talese’s writing style. In the 1960s he was a pioneer of the New Journalsim, which used fictional and literary techniques to tell his nonfiction stories. But what readers should have been focusing on was his reporting, which is meticulous, exacting and precise. Talese, according to […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Share