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Harrison Salisbury, pen and ink by Jim Stovall © 2017

50 years ago, Harrison Salisbury did not win the Pulitzer Prize

  Fifty years ago when the Pulitzer Prizes were awarded, politics — not merit — kept Harrison Salisbury from winning the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting. This week’s announcement (see below) of the latest prizes brings this sad tale to mind. Salisbury was a reporter and editor for the New York Times who already had […]

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Richard Ben Cramer

A journalist needs something to write about: Richard Ben Cramer, Alex Rodriguez and the book that did not get written

In 2006 Cramer sold both his publisher and his subject on a book about Alex Rodriguez, the star of the New York Yankees who was recently banned for a year by Major League Baseball for taking banned substances. The book had the title, The Importance of Being Alex: A Life with the Yankees. He had […]

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7 reasons why you should encourage your students to tweet your lectures

Some professors ban laptops, tablets and smart phones from their classrooms, seeing them as distractions for their students. Instead, they should welcome them as tools for engagement.

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Going online: What I tell high school teachers and students

A news website gives scholastic journalists the opportunity to do something they’ve never done — practice “daily journalism.”

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JKFreadingnewspaper-1

John F. Kennedy on the importance of open government (audio)

In April 1961, a few months after taking office as president of the United States, John F. Kennedy spoke to the American Newspaper Publishers Association about the importance of maintaining an open government. In the speech he said, “The very word ‘secrecy’ is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a […]

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Tennessee Journalism Series: Media Reporting

Reporting is hard work. It is frustrating and difficult. Reporters are constantly called upon to use their wit and imagination, to think of where information is and who has it — and then to persuade those who have it to give it up. Reporters do not have subpoena power. They cannot compel sources to part […]

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Obiturary stories

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Speech stories

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Do reporters have more fun?

Chapter 8 in Journalism: Who, What, When, Where, Why and How emphasizes how difficult it is to be a reporter. That’s certainly true. But it’s also fun.

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Changing quotations

One of the continuing practical problems that arises often in the nation’s newsrooms is how to handle direct quotations.

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