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William Hazlitt on the lot of the writer

William Hazlitt is a name we hear little of today, but in the first quarter of the nineteenth century, he was a well-known and well read journalist and essayist (when those people were really valued) in England. Here is what he wrote on the lot of the writer: An author wastes his time in painful […]

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Congratulations, President Barack Obama

A remarkable feat by a remarkable man who will take the oath of office on Jan. 20, 2009. An author and college professor, he is now at the pinnacle of political power. We join with the world in wishing him well. And congratulations to the United States of America.

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ICONN conference, Day 2 – pictures of session 3

The first session of the morning of the second day of the Intercollegiate Online News Network is underway. Above are some pictures. The people on the panel are 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.Professional affiliates Tammi Marcoullier, Publish2 Bob Benz, Radiant Markets Michael Marshall, UPI Jay Baird, Mochi Media Peter Gross, director, School of Journalism and Electronic […]

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ICONN conference, Day 1 – pictures and links

Listen to an audio file of the first session. (Unedited, 57:30) The first day of the Intercollegiate Online News Network founders conference at the University of Tennessee saw a journalism academics, students and professionals come together to discuss ways to better integrate online journalism into journalism curricula. Above are pictures from the first day’s sessions. […]

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Re-thinking the old media forms

Yes, you can do the old forms on the web. But should you? This “old media” type says we should re-think the forms of our content. This New York Times article by Virginia Heffernan is bit depressing but very perceptive. She writes: . . .they should think about what content suits these new modes of […]

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Stories behind the Frost/Nixon movie, confrontation

The stories behind the 1977 verbal confrontation between Richard Nixon and David Frost continue to fascinate. The release of the Ron Howard movie Frost/Nixon has given us some great stories from that era. We looked at the transformation of David Frost from satirist to journalist a bit in an earlier post. National Public Radio’s Fresh […]

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William Tecumseh Sherman: Marching through the American mind

The Union Army, under the command of William Tecumseh Sherman, decamped from a devastated and burning Atlanta on November 16, 1864 and marched across the expanse of Georgia until it reached Savannah. The purpose, according to its commander, was to bring the horrors of war into the farms, fields, parlors and living rooms of the […]

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Pulitzers to include online news organizations

This pretty much speaks for itself and can be filed under the “it’s about time” category: Prizes broadened to include online-only publications primarily devoted to original news reporting The Pulitzer Prizes in journalism have been expanded to include many text-based newspapers and news organizations that publish only on the Internet. The Pulitzer Board also has […]

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Inside David Frost’s transformation from satirist to journalist

With the release of the movie Frost/Nixon, Clive Irving (books on Amazon) describes the transformation of David Frost from satirist to journalist. Irving was on the inside of this story, and the view is fascinating. In the summer of 1966, Irving was one of two people hired by David Frost as “creative consultants” for The […]

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The man who didn’t invent Christmas

Charles Dickens had a lot to do with the image we have of the Christmas season — Victorian England and all that — but he didn’t invent Christmas. Several months ago I posted on an earlier blog an essay on book titles that make too much of a claim for their subjects. And I have […]

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A Most Wanted Man: Surrender

A Most Wanted Man by John le Carré I gave up on this book after 100 pages. Nothing happened except for the author introducing some rather dull characters in a rather dull place. Every time I picked the book up, I did so with the hope that this time, something important and exciting would happen. […]

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A permanent Republican majority: RIP

Recent memory holds the idea of the “permanent Republican majority.” It had the Republicans crowing and the Democrats quaking. Ron Brownstein gives us an idea of how far through political space we have traveled since then: The consistent thread linking the 2006 and 2008 elections was the narrowing of the playing field for Republicans even […]

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Staying Booked has moved

Staying Booked has move to the Writing Wright. Check us out there. Many thanks.

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Commenting on Dana Milbank’s ‘Team of Losers’

Dana Milbank, one of the Washington Post‘s top political reporters, had an item in his blog Rough Sketch on Wednesday saying the Republicans in Congress had awarded the failure of their leaders by retaining them in their leadership jobs. Interesting post, to which I commented: The Republicans are acting like any great American corporation. Your […]

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Ayers: No regrets for stand against Vietnam war

William Ayers, head of the 1960s radical antiwar group Weather Underground who became a major issue in the presidential election campaign, told a radio interviewer Tuesday that he had “no regrets for taking a stand” against the war in Vietnam.Ayers appeared on Fresh Air with Terri Gross, a National Public Radio show, and talked with […]

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Non-profit news: the new journalism

The New York Times has an article this morning on non-profit journalism — an idea that has been around for a while. In fact, the Christian Science Monitor had a similar article, spotlighting the VoiceofSanDiego as the Times article did, back in February. There are also articles in the Columbia Journalism Review, American Journalism Review, […]

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Barack Obama: America’s ‘Professor in Chief’

Richard Monastersky, a senior writer for the Chronicle of Higher Education, has an article in a recent edition of the publication pointing out a number of things about the election of Barack Obama and Joe Biden with regard to higher education. Obama is a former professor. He taught at the University of Chicago Law School […]

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How open will the Obama administration be?

National Public Radio had a story this morning speculating on how open the new Barack Obama administration will be. The story quotes former University of Alabama student (and friend) Christi Parsons, who covered the state legislature in Springfield for the Chicago Tribune when Obama was a state senator. The gist of the story is that […]

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The Brass Verdict brings back Mickey Haller

The Brass Verdict by Michael Connelly Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller returns in Michael Connelly’s last mystery/thriller. And this time, Connelly teams him up (sort of) with Harry Bosch, the author’s long-running detective character. Haller is not your paragon of virtue, but he is clever and interesting. Haller is returning from a year off, much of […]

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Barack Obama, president-elect

Congratulations, Barack Obama. President-elect. Truly remarkable. Truly. And congratulations to Senator John McCain for your unquestioned patriotism and courage and your service to your country.

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