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CBS and the Bush National Guard memos

The big media story of the week was a report of an internal investigation that CBS News conducted on a story aired in September concerning George W. Bush’s service in the National Guard in the 1970s.

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Put your news on the pod

Podcasting is one of the new terms in online journalism. It simply means putting news and information into an audio MP3 format and making it available to folks who own MP3 players

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Off again, on again

The general manager of the public radio station in Lexington, Ky., caused a minor flap late last week by announcing that he was pulling Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac off WUKY.

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News orgs discover web’s immediacy

A couple of stories from Romenesko’s blog on today show that big time news organizations are discovering the immediacy of the web.

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Couric takes over

In the long history of the CBS Evening News, there had been only three permanent anchors: Douglas Edwards, Walter Cronkite and Dan Rather. Now there is a fourth.

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Short videos on broadcast writing

For those interested in teaching or learning to write in broadcast style, you should listen to or watch four short video clips about broadcast writing produced by my friend and colleague Mark Harmon, a professor of journalism and electronic media here at UT.

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Broadcasting style tips by Laurie Lattimore

Broadcast writing demands a special set of skills and knowledge from the journalist. Broadcast copy is written to be read out loud by a news reader rather than to be read silently by a news consumer. The words and sentences must be constructed so they are accurate and clear. They must also complement the pictures, […]

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Conflict of interest

One of the basic tenets of journalistic practice is that a journalist should be independent. That is, a journalist should not work for any person or organization except the news organization that he or she represents.

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Is television killing sports columnists?

Stephen Rodrick, writing for Slate magazine, seems to think it is.

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Political cartooning – a chance for survival?

The number of political cartoonists, by one estimate, has dwindled to about 85 fulltime people. Newspapers, as usual, seem bent on cutting costs rather than delivering quality, so the local cartoonist is let go, encouraged to leave or not replaced when he or she does leave. Instead of encouraging this kind of journalism by growing […]

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Not enough women opinion writers

There aren’t enough women opinion writers — or at least not enough of them make it onto the pages of America’s newspapers. That’s the issue, not what Susan Estrich thinks about Michael Kinsley or how he has responded to her, entertaining as all that might be.

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Inside a cartoonist’s mind

ulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Jim Borgman is giving us a fascinating peek inside the mind of the editorial cartoonist with his new weblog, BorgBlog. Borgman is posting not just some of his cartoons but some of his sketches and his thoughts about how particular cartoons develop. The site currently has three versions of the cartoon he […]

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Finding maps to use

If you are working for a publication – high school or college – you should not use maps created by MapQuest or some other professional service without specific permission from that service. To do so is a violation of copyright laws.

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Graphics journalism: Advice for beginners

Study charts that have been professionally produced by newspapers or news web sites. The Associated Press has a graphics department that produces many charts used by newspapers every day. Look closely at the way they are put together.

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Want it to last? Draw, don’t write

A great moment in the history of science was the publication of Andreas Vesalius’s anatomy book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, in 1543. What made the book a triumph wasn’t the Latin text Vesalius wrote but the 420 illustrations.

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Reporting religion

Religion and religious topics are not particularly welcomed in a newsroom. That is why years such as 2004, when religion is a big part of some of the year’s biggest stories (gay marriage, the presidential election, Mel Gibson’s movie “The Passion of Christ,” etc.) are tough for journalists. Why then are editors and news directors […]

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The ‘essentially accurate’ standard

Abraham Lincoln began the Gettysburg Address with the words, “About a century ago, the dudes that started it all . . .” Well, ok. Those weren’t exactly the words, but they are “essentially accurate.” That’s the standard that Detroit Free Press sportswriter Mitch Albom imposed upon himself in handling direct quotations for his column. Apparently, […]

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Women as news sources

That is the basic finding of a new study conducted by the Project for Excellence in Journalism and funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts. The basic finding is probably not surprising, but what is impressive and important is how widespread and consistent is the tendency of journalists to use men rather than women as sources […]

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Web Journalism: Practice and Promise of a New Medium

Web Journalism: Practice and Promise of a New Medium explores the current practices and future possibilities of Web journalism and examines the characteristics of the Web that distinguish it from traditional media.

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Seeing Suffrage: Two Ladies from Iowa

One of the great pleasures of putting together the book Seeing Suffrage: The 1913 Washington Suffrage Parade, Its Photographs, and Its Effect on the American Political Landscape was taking a close look at the photographs that were available for the book. They were interesting and beautiful. But there was one that stands out as my […]

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