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Dwight Teeter

The First Amendment today

The nation seems to be in a state of perpetual war, and during times of crisis, individual freedoms are always in danger. Professor Dwight Teeter of the University of Tennessee discusses the state and strength of First Amendment freedoms today.

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Writing for the Mass Media now an all-digital offering from Pearson

Writing for the Mass Media, now in its ninth edition and in print since 1985, is now being offered by Pearson, the publisher, in a digital edition that downloads to all formats and devices. This book, which is used as a textbook for courses in about 200 colleges and universities each year, is one of […]

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The First Amendment, Luther Baldwin and the Alien and Sedition Acts

University of Tennessee professor Dwight Teeter discusses the case of Luther Baldwin, a New Jersey man who was prosecuted under the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798. Baldwin became a symbol of Federalist intolerance during the 1800 presidential election. This video is part of the Tennessee Journalism Series and was produced and edited by Jim […]

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Writing good tags should be part of the journalist’s writing process

At minimum, tags should include • all of the proper names and places referred to in your story; • major ideas and concepts of the subject of the story: • important actions and processes referred to in the story.

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Jonathan Swift, writer ‘to the vulgar’

Jonathan Swift wanted his writing to be “understood by the meanest.” It’s the standard we want our journalism students to shoot for.

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How we got the First Amendment (video)

In this two-and-a-half minute video, Dr. Dwight Teeter explains some of the political maneuvering that occurred to get the an amendment guaranteeing freedom of speech into the hotly-debated Constitution in the late 1780s. The freedoms protected by the amendment — religion, speech, press, assembly and petition — were not foremost in the minds of the […]

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7 reasons why you should encourage your students to tweet your lectures

Some professors ban laptops, tablets and smart phones from their classrooms, seeing them as distractions for their students. Instead, they should welcome them as tools for engagement.

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Newswriting in the near future

The speed of the Internet and the World Wide Web in disseminating information has forced editors and journalists to rethink the way they present news and the structure of writing.

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Creating an interactive chart with Google Spreadsheets (video)

How do you make an interactive chart like this one and put it onto your web page? The video on this page will explain it all.

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Going online: What I tell high school teachers and students

A news website gives scholastic journalists the opportunity to do something they’ve never done — practice “daily journalism.”

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