Archive | Civil War RSS feed for this section

Reviews, they always help; Battlelines: the complete Gettysburg

Jim Stovall’s email newsletter for July 14, 2017 Hi there, I hope you’ve had a good week and are looking forward to the weekend. Reviews Writers always want people to read their books, and they want their readers to love what they read. But what the writer needs is honesty. That’s why I alway suggest […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
703-AW-CemeteryHillprePickettCharge-21315v

Battlelines: Gettysburg: Day 1, July 1, 1863

Once again, we are sharing a post with the Knoxville Civil War Roundtable. Note: The annual anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg is this weekend. To commemorate that, we are posting, with permission, excerpts from Battlelines: Gettysburg, that describe aspects of the battle. Battlelines: Gettysburg contains the battlefield drawings of Alfred Waud and Edwin Forbes, […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
703-AW-CemeteryHillprePickettCharge-21315v

Civil War Trust provides excellent video introduction to Gettysburg

Gettysburg is so iconic — particularly because of the Gettysburg Address that Abraham Lincoln delivered four months after the battle — that we tend to lose sight of what it meant to the people who lived during the war.

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Brian McKnight

Brian McKnight tells KCWRT about the life of Champ Ferguson

Historian Brian McKnight, professor at the University of Virginia-Wise, told the Knoxville Civil War Roundtable on Tuesday that partisan fighter and Confederate outlaw Champ Ferguson was a man who saw the world as “black or white.”

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Images of Abraham Lincoln

What did Lincoln look like?

The 19th century was just as image conscious as our age, and one of the masters of image was Abraham Lincoln. The sidebar on page 389 of Journalism: Who, What, When, Where, Why and How tells about a famous photo of Lincoln that was used in the election campaign of 1860.

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Front cover of Battlelines: Gettysburg

Battlelines: Gettysburg displays never-before-published work of Civil War sketch artists

Many rare and never-before-published drawings of Civil War sketch artists are now available in Battlelines: Gettysburg, newly released by First Inning Press.

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Life-WWII-photo

Three Dead Americans: Life’s famous World War II photo

Americans waited nearly two years before the news media printed a combat photograph that showed a dead U.S. serviceman. The reasons for that wait were that such producing such photos are too shocking for the friends and families of the deceased and that the public’s morale and support for the war might be diminished. The […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

George Smalley and the Battle of Antietam

One of the most dramatic stories of a correspondent covering a battle in the Civil War is that of George Smalley of the New York Tribune and his adventure in getting his description of the battle of Antietam back to New York. Smalley’s first accounts of the 1862 battle were read by President Abraham Lincoln […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Battlefield coverage: Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg!

Rable notes how difficult it was to cover such an encounter between armies and how hard it was to get information from the field to the publication for which the reporter worked. One other difficulty that reporters had: figuring out who won. It was not always apparent.

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Crowdsourcing the Civil War

In the video below, George Rable, University of Alabama history professor, discusses the sources of information that newspaper editors during the Civil War used for their reports about battles and the war in general. One important source was letters from soldiers — a form of what we could call today crowdsourcing. This means using the […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Share