About Jim Stovall

Jim Stovall, a retired journalism prof, is now a novelist, self publisher, watercolorist, gardener, woodworker and beekeeper -- among others things.
Author Archive | Jim Stovall

Cyn Mobley to host Internet radio call-in show on publishing

Best-selling thriller novelist Cyn Mobley will host her first Internet radio call-in show on what it takes to get published on Thursday, Nov. 20, 2008 at 7 p.m. EST at Talkshoe.com. The link to the show is here: http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/32978 The show is set up so you can just listen in or you can call via […]

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Commenting on Dana Milbank’s ‘Team of Losers’

Dana Milbank, one of the Washington Post‘s top political reporters, had an item in his blog Rough Sketch on Wednesday saying the Republicans in Congress had awarded the failure of their leaders by retaining them in their leadership jobs. Interesting post, to which I commented: The Republicans are acting like any great American corporation. Your […]

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Ayers: No regrets for stand against Vietnam war

William Ayers, head of the 1960s radical antiwar group Weather Underground who became a major issue in the presidential election campaign, told a radio interviewer Tuesday that he had “no regrets for taking a stand” against the war in Vietnam.Ayers appeared on Fresh Air with Terri Gross, a National Public Radio show, and talked with […]

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Non-profit news: the new journalism

The New York Times has an article this morning on non-profit journalism — an idea that has been around for a while. In fact, the Christian Science Monitor had a similar article, spotlighting the VoiceofSanDiego as the Times article did, back in February. There are also articles in the Columbia Journalism Review, American Journalism Review, […]

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Non-profit news: the new journalism

The New York Times has an article this morning on non-profit journalism — an idea that has been around for a while. In fact, the Christian Science Monitor had a similar article, spotlighting the VoiceofSanDiego as the Times article did, back in February. There are also articles in the Columbia Journalism Review, American Journalism Review, […]

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Barack Obama: America’s ‘Professor in Chief’

Richard Monastersky, a senior writer for the Chronicle of Higher Education, has an article in a recent edition of the publication pointing out a number of things about the election of Barack Obama and Joe Biden with regard to higher education. Obama is a former professor. He taught at the University of Chicago Law School […]

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How open will the Obama administration be?

National Public Radio had a story this morning speculating on how open the new Barack Obama administration will be. The story quotes former University of Alabama student (and friend) Christi Parsons, who covered the state legislature in Springfield for the Chicago Tribune when Obama was a state senator. The gist of the story is that […]

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The Brass Verdict brings back Mickey Haller

The Brass Verdict by Michael Connelly Lincoln Lawyer Mickey Haller returns in Michael Connelly’s last mystery/thriller. And this time, Connelly teams him up (sort of) with Harry Bosch, the author’s long-running detective character. Haller is not your paragon of virtue, but he is clever and interesting. Haller is returning from a year off, much of […]

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Barack Obama, president-elect

Congratulations, Barack Obama. President-elect. Truly remarkable. Truly. And congratulations to Senator John McCain for your unquestioned patriotism and courage and your service to your country.

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The audacity of hope for Barack Obama, the writer

Barack Obama wrote his own book — no ghostwriters or co-authors. He did the literary heavy-lifting himself. It was with plenty of audacity and no small amount of hope that Barack Obama sat down in the early 1990s to write his life story. He had just turned 30 in 1991 and could reasonably assume that […]

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Christian Science Monitor book page: interesting stuff

A good book review in the mainstream media (MSM) is getting harder to find. Not many of the MSM have retained strong book pages or coverage. The New York Times, of course, is the exception, as it has always been. There is not only the Sunday Book Review, which I have read for many years, […]

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Supreme Courtship: funny, light read

Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley rating: 4 of 5 stars Just finished Christopher Buckley’s Supreme Courtship. Very funny in places and a bit silly in others. Still, an enjoyable read and always a dig at the powers that be. Pepper Cartwright is a very popular TV judge who is nominated for a U.S. Supreme Court […]

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Elmore Leonard: Rules for writing

Lots of people seem to want rules for writing — as if that makes the process easier. (It doesn’t.) Still, these rules make for interesting reading and are sometimes good reminders. They are the habits that writers should develop. Elmore Leonard works in the genre of fiction, but his rules are worth noting for any […]

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The power of the narrative and the McCain campaign

The narrative and the central idea of a McCain presidency has not emerged during the campaign. The presidential campaign of John McCain comes under the scrutiny of the New York Times Sunday Magazine this week in a long and revealing article by Robert Draper. The author uses the motif of the “shifting narrative” to explain […]

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A coaching clinic by the Bear

The day was gray and the field muddy when the Vols and the Tide met in Neyland Stadium in 1966. Despite the conditions, the players on both sides played like champions and produced one of the greatest meetings of the Alabama-Tennessee rivalry. As one of 56,000 rain-soaked fans in Neyland Stadium, I peered out from […]

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World Series begins tonight

The World Series begins tonight. Let’s hope for the best. The World Series: two vaunted teams with rich baseball histories, a couple of well-known and wiley managers, big stars on both sides set to make each inning a drama-filled delight, a bit of controversy or personal animus thrown in just to spice things up. Well, […]

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Link journalism – the shape of news to come?

Two web sites came onto my radar this weekend that set me to thinking about the shape of journalism on the web. A friend recommended Publishing 2.0, an excellent and provocative gathering of articles about journalism put together by Scott Karp and Robert Young. The article from this site that got my attention showed up […]

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Complete sentences vs. fragments

A little coherence and evidence of intellectual activity from the presidential candidates — is that too much to ask? David Ignatius, columnist for the Washington Post, noted the following about this week’s presidential debate in Nashville: Is it “presidential” to speak in clear sentences that have a beginning, a middle and an end? If so, […]

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A century too soon for Cubs fans

rating: 4 of 5 stars Now that fans of the Chicago Cubs have been put out of their impending misery (you didn’t really think the Cubs were going to the Series, did you?), they can retire for the winter with this book and wish they had been born about 100 years earlier. When the Cubs […]

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Writing the Amazon-ready review

Rule No. 1 in writing an Amazon review: Be honest. Rule No. 2: Keep it short. Lunch conversation with my good friend Cyn Mobley the other day turned toward our writing group and the things the group could do to help each other promote our books. She asked me to come up with a list […]

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