About Jim Stovall

Jim Stovall, a retired journalism prof, is now a novelist, self publisher, watercolorist, gardener, woodworker and beekeeper -- among others things.
Author Archive | Jim Stovall

Hemingway, Dos Passos and the Spanish Civil War in an odd, interesting tale

The Spanish Civil War and the leftist learnings of many 1930s artists are central to the story of the disintegration of the friendship of Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos. A test: Which of these men have you heard of? Ernest Hemingway? You kidding? Of course. Read his books and many of his short stories. […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The writer’s life, Gay Talese style

For more than 40 years, there has been intense interest in the writing style exemplified by Gay Talese – and in Gay Talese (web site) himself. But that emphasis, particularly in Talese himself, may have been misplaced. Talese is certainly a writer of utmost grace. He works at his profession with an intensity that is […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The fiction writer’s bookshelf

If you are interested in writing fiction, here are two of the best books you can have: Christopher VoglerThe Writer’s Journey Renni Brown and David KingSelf-Editing for Fiction Writers (These are the Amazon links.) No one explains “story” better than Vogler. I’m going to post these to a couple of lists to which I subscribe […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Alexander McCall Smith on NYT Book Review podcast

Alexander McCall Smith talks about his latest efforts on the NYT Book Review podcast. Lovers of Alexander McCall Smith’s books may want to tune in (so to speak) on the audio interview with him by the New York Times Book Review podcast. Here’s the page with all the podcast links going back to 2006, and […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The Invention Conceit

In our modern Scots-invented world of bloviation, headlines and titles can’t stand the heat of a literalist’s kitchen. Being a literalist when it comes to words and their usage (though not without a sense of humor, I hope), I tend to pay attention to headlines and titles and to parse them unmercifully. That’s why, when […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

First things first

You won’t find too many partisan political statements on this blog unless they come from commenters. But there is one thing I believe in: the idea behind the First Amendment. People have the right to speak, write and think as they please. Jeremiah Wright, Pat Robertson, and anyone else in the public realm may say […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The self-publishing phenomenon

It used to be hard thing to get your book published. Now it’s not. Rachel Danadio has an interesting essay, “You’re an Author? Me Too,” in the New York Times on the self-publishing phenomenon. And you get the feeling that she’d rather return to the good old days when agents and publishers and book review […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Review: The Last Casualty

An Episcopal priest hears the confessions of a dying man. Get ready for a ride. THE LAST CASUALTY, (Amazon) the latest thriller by Cyn Mobley, is like an Indiana Jones movie, a wild ride that never lets you catch your breath. David Dalt is a U.S. Navy Episcopal priest and an ex-SEAL — except that […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Wolhwend in the NYT

Good friend Chris Wohlwend has an article in the New York Times about University of Tennessee footballer Jackie Walker, one of the first black players for the Vols in the late sixties and early seventies. Walker’s take is a sad one, but he finally getting some of the recognition that should have been his years […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Good writing from a baseball insider

• When is the last time you called a major league baseball player a good writer? Lots of talented authors have written superbly about baseball. Among all our national games, baseball is a game that lends itself easily to good wordsmiths. But rare among those smithies is an author who has played the game at […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Eliot Spitzer as fiction

Novelist Richard Russo puts Eliot Spitzer into the realm of fictional hero — or protagonist. Some disagreement with Russo, but it’s an interesting thought. What if you wrote a novel about Eliot Spitzer? What would it look like? That’s the question that novelist Richard Russo considers in an interesting column in the March 16 in […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The Newseum opens in Washington

Gannett’s splashy new monument to journalism, the Newseum, opened in Washington yesterday. For the most part, I think, the reviews are good. (Check out this interactive guide at USA Today. And here’s the review.) (My old friend from Navy days, Thomas A.K. Kai, was there and sent me a link to the pictures he took, […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

TNJN wins regional SPJ awards

The Tennessee Journalist <TNJN.com>, the news web site of the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at UT, has been named as the best independent news web site for Region 12 of the Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence awards. A number of the staffers have received individual awards. I am the faculty adviser […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Public Conversation on Web Journalism conference at UT

The University of Tennessee School of Journalism and Electronic Media is hosting a two-day conference titled “A Public Conversation on Web Journalism” on April 3-4. The conference is being funded by a grant from the Scripps Foundation. It will feature Rob Curley, vice president of WashingtonPost.Newsweek Interactive, as the dinner speaker on Thursday evening. Among […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The Tennessee Journalist

The Tennessee Journalist is the news web site of the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee. TNJN.com was created in the fall of 2006, soon after I joined the faculty at UT. This news site is part of the curriculum of the School and is operated by a student staff. […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

JPROF’s third anniversary

JPROF observes its third anniversary today. Three years ago, after a couple of months of preparation, I launched JPROF from my small study in the house we were renting from Emory and Henry College in Emory, Va. The site was a personal endeavor, designed to help me keep up with the field of journalism so […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Audio slide shows

Web journalism students should learn how to produce an audio slide show. These things are not easy to do in that they require students to select pictures for a slide sequence and write a script that will be recorded for that sequence. But they are certainly well within a student’s grasp. This article on JPROF […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Launching Politico

The coming launch of the political news web site Politico has drawn much attention from those who wonder about its longevity (see the latest New York Times article about it; and an earlier one). I have no idea about how long it will last — though, being a political news junkie, I hope it will […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Tributes to a coach

Not a football coach, though it is that time of year. A writing coach. Don Murray, a man whose work and ideas influenced many of us in the business of writing and teaching writing, passed away Dec. 30. Writing gurus Roy Peter Clark and Chip Scanlon at the Poynter Institute have written fitting tributes to […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

2007 — year of the First Amendment?

Well, it isn’t likely, but I always begin a year with that great hope — and very little else. There is no reason to be confident. Our leaders want to diminish the rights of the Constitution because it will make them more comfortable and more secure in their power. The people seem to buy these […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Share