About Jim Stovall

Jim Stovall, a retired journalism prof, is now a novelist, self publisher, watercolorist, gardener, woodworker and beekeeper -- among others things.
Author Archive | Jim Stovall
Harrison Salisbury, pen and ink by Jim Stovall © 2017

50 years ago, Harrison Salisbury did not win the Pulitzer Prize

  Fifty years ago when the Pulitzer Prizes were awarded, politics — not merit — kept Harrison Salisbury from winning the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting. This week’s announcement (see below) of the latest prizes brings this sad tale to mind. Salisbury was a reporter and editor for the New York Times who already had […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

The First Amendment today | JPROF.com

Source: The First Amendment today | JPROF.com

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Rules for using commas

Ever wish you had a single sheet with all the basic rules for using commas on it? You could hand that to your students and say something like, “Here, learn this. We’ll have a test next week. You won’t ever have an excuse for misusing a comma again.” Well, your dream has been fulfilled. JPROF.com […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Banjo at Rest

At the corner of Banjo and Watercolor

A couple of weeks ago, I went onto YouTube (the modern source of all wisdom and knowledge) to find a video of someone playing or singing “Cumberland Mountain Deer Chase,” an old Uncle Dave Macon tune. My local dulcimer group was playing it, and I needed to get a good idea of the melody. I […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Queen Anne's lace, watercolor, 11 x 14

Watercolors for the beekeepers

Here are a couple of recently-completed watercolors that I am donating to the Blount County Beekeepers Association annual auction on Monday evening. Both have mountain-ish backgrounds, and one is based on a recent photograph by my good friend Jim Bennett. The BCBA auction raises money for grants to new beekeepers, one of the many great things the […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Second cedar chest of the season

This is my second cedar chest of the year. This one is smaller (33x23x15) than the first that I completed in August, and the joinery is different. I used three-inch wide planks of cedar and put them together so that they made finger joints at each corner. But like the first cedar chest, the wood […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
703-AW-CemeteryHillprePickettCharge-21315v

Battlelines: Gettysburg: Day 1, July 1, 1863

Once again, we are sharing a post with the Knoxville Civil War Roundtable. Note: The annual anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg is this weekend. To commemorate that, we are posting, with permission, excerpts from Battlelines: Gettysburg, that describe aspects of the battle. Battlelines: Gettysburg contains the battlefield drawings of Alfred Waud and Edwin Forbes, […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }
703-AW-CemeteryHillprePickettCharge-21315v

Civil War Trust provides excellent video introduction to Gettysburg

Gettysburg is so iconic — particularly because of the Gettysburg Address that Abraham Lincoln delivered four months after the battle — that we tend to lose sight of what it meant to the people who lived during the war.

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Brian McKnight

Brian McKnight tells KCWRT about the life of Champ Ferguson

Historian Brian McKnight, professor at the University of Virginia-Wise, told the Knoxville Civil War Roundtable on Tuesday that partisan fighter and Confederate outlaw Champ Ferguson was a man who saw the world as “black or white.”

Read full story Comments { 0 }
Images of Abraham Lincoln

What did Lincoln look like?

The 19th century was just as image conscious as our age, and one of the masters of image was Abraham Lincoln. The sidebar on page 389 of Journalism: Who, What, When, Where, Why and How tells about a famous photo of Lincoln that was used in the election campaign of 1860.

Read full story Comments { 0 }