Shadows of Summer – four line and wash drawings

 


These drawings come from a watercolor class that I am taking at the local community college (Pellissippi State) this semester. They were executed in about an hour and a half.

The main point of these drawings was for me to learn something about “hot press” paper. In watercolor there are three kinds of paper: cold press, which is what I am most familiar with; hot press, which I rarely use; and rough, which I do not use at all.

Cold press is a paper that comes in various weights and has a texture that absorbs much of the paint and allows mixing of colors easily. If you are just starting watercolor, cold press is probably what you want to use.

Hot press also comes in various weights, but it has a smooth texture (though not as smooth as Bristol board, which I have use a lot for pen and ink drawings. Hot press paper and watercolor paint have a different relationship than that between cold press and watercolor. Hot press paper general is not as absorbent and paints mix less easily. You are likely to get harder edges to your color than on cold press paper.

The paintings here are “line and wash” because they mix pen and ink and watercolor. In this case, the lines were drawn first, mostly as gesture drawings, and then the color was applied afterward.

The subjects were taken from photographs in Don Honig’s wonderful book of turn-of-the-century baseball photos. Shadows of Summer. This large-format book gives an excellent look at baseball plays, managers, umpires, and even fans in marvelous detail. I have used this book before to practice figure drawing and will undoubtedly do so again.

So, enjoy. Shadows of Summer.

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About Jim Stovall

Jim Stovall, a retired journalism prof, is now a novelist, self publisher, watercolorist, gardener, woodworker and beekeeper -- among others things.

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